Drupal Feeds

Appnovation Technologies: 3 Reasons to use Drupal for Enterprise Online Portal Dev

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2014-07-30 15:36
"Enterprise Content Management" or ECM minimally encompasses Document Management, Collaboration, Records Management and Web Content Management. An enterprise online portal is a specially designed website that acts as an entry point for bringing information together from all these diverse sources in a uniform way. Building an enterprise online portal presents a unique set of challenges, including integrated authentication, governance of content added by multiple content contributors, migration of legacy data, and hosting within an enterprise infrastructure among others. var switchTo5x = false;stLight.options({"publisher":"dr-75626d0b-d9b4-2fdb-6d29-1a20f61d683"});

Appnovation Technologies: 3 Reasons to use Drupal for Enterprise Online Portal Dev

Feeds from Drupal.org - Wed, 2014-07-30 15:36
"Enterprise Content Management" or ECM minimally encompasses Document Management, Collaboration, Records Management and Web Content Management. An enterprise online portal is a specially designed website that acts as an entry point for bringing information together from all these diverse sources in a uniform way. Building an enterprise online portal presents a unique set of challenges, including integrated authentication, governance of content added by multiple content contributors, migration of legacy data, and hosting within an enterprise infrastructure among others. var switchTo5x = false;stLight.options({"publisher":"dr-75626d0b-d9b4-2fdb-6d29-1a20f61d683"});
Categories: Straight From Drupal

Dcycle: New Drupal 7 project checklist

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2014-07-30 14:10

I had this checklist documented internally, but I keep referring back to it so I'll make it available here in case anyone else needs it. The idea here is to document a minimum (not an ideal) set of modules and tasks which I do for almost all projects.

Questions to ask of a client at the project launch
  • Is your site bilingual? If so is there more than one domain?
  • What type of compatibility do you need: tablet, mobile, which versions of IE?
  • How do you see your post-launch support and core/module update contract?
  • Do you need SSL support?
  • What is your hosting arrangement?
  • Do you have a contact form?
  • What is your anti-spam method? Note that CAPTCHA is no longer useful; I like Mollom, but it's giving me more and more false positives with time.
  • Is WYSIWYG required? I strongly suggest using Markdown instead.
  • Confirm that all emails are sent in plain text, not HTML. If you're sending out HTML mail, do it right.
  • Do you need an on-site search utility? If so, some thought, and resources, need to go into it or it will be frustrating.
  • What kind of load do you expect on your site (anonymous and admin users)? This information can be used for load testing.
  • If you already have a site, should old paths of critical content map to paths on the new site?
  • Should users be allowed to create accounts (with spam considerations, and see if an admin should approve them).
Sprint Zero: starting the project

Here is what should get done in the first Agile sprint, aka Sprint Zero:

  • If you are using continuous integration, a Jenkins job for tracking the master branch: this job should fail if any test fails on the codebase, or if quality metrics (code review, for example, or pdepend metrics) reach predefined thresholds.
  • A Jenkins job for pushing to dev. This is triggered by the first job if tests pass. It pushed the new code to the dev environment, and updates the dev environment's database. The database is never cloned; rather, a site deployment module is used.
  • An issue queue is set up and the client is given access to it, and training on how to use it.
  • A wiki is set up.
  • A dev environment is set up. This is where the code gets pushed automatically if all tests pass.
  • A prod environment is set up. This environment is normally updated manually after each end of sprint demo.
  • A git repo is set up with a basic Drupal site.
  • A custom module is set up in sites/*/modules/custom: this is where custom function go.
  • A site deployment module in sites/all/modules/custom. All deployment-related code and dependencies go here. A .test file and an .install should be included.
  • A site development module is set up in sites/*/modules/custom, which is meant to contain all modules required or useful for development, as dependencies.
  • A custom theme is created.
  • An initial feature is created in sites/*/modules/features. This is where all your features will be added.
  • A "sites/*/modules/patches" folder is created (with a README.txt file, to make sure it goes into git). This is where core and contrib patches should go. Your site's maintainers should apply these patches when core or contrib modules are updated. Patch names here should include the node id and comment number on Drupal.org.
Basic module list (always used) Development modules (not enabled on production)

I normally create a custom development module with these as dependencies:

Multilingual modules Launch checklist
  • Design a custom 404, error and maintenance page.
  • Path, alias and permalink strategy. (Might require pathauto.)
  • Think of adding revisions to content types to avoid clients losing their data.
  • Don't display errors on production.
  • Optimize CSS, JS and page caching.
  • Views should be cached.
  • System messages are properly themed.
  • Prevent very simple passwords.
  • Using syslog instead of dblog on prod
In conclusion

Most shops, and most developers, have some sort of checklist like this. Mine is not any better or worse than most, but can be a good starting point. Another note: I've seen at least three Drupal teams try, and fail, to implement a "Drupal Starter kit for Company XYZ" and keep it under version control. The problem with that approach, as opposed to a checklist, is that it's not lightweight enough: it is a software product which needs maintenance, and after a while no one maintains it.

Tags: blogplanet

Dcycle: New Drupal 7 project checklist

Feeds from Drupal.org - Wed, 2014-07-30 14:10

I had this checklist documented internally, but I keep referring back to it so I'll make it available here in case anyone else needs it. The idea here is to document a minimum (not an ideal) set of modules and tasks which I do for almost all projects.

Questions to ask of a client at the project launch
  • Is your site bilingual? If so is there more than one domain?
  • What type of compatibility do you need: tablet, mobile, which versions of IE?
  • How do you see your post-launch support and core/module update contract?
  • Do you need SSL support?
  • What is your hosting arrangement?
  • Do you have a contact form?
  • What is your anti-spam method? Note that CAPTCHA is no longer useful; I like Mollom, but it's giving me more and more false positives with time.
  • Is WYSIWYG required? I strongly suggest using Markdown instead.
  • Confirm that all emails are sent in plain text, not HTML. If you're sending out HTML mail, do it right.
  • Do you need an on-site search utility? If so, some thought, and resources, need to go into it or it will be frustrating.
  • What kind of load do you expect on your site (anonymous and admin users)? This information can be used for load testing.
  • If you already have a site, should old paths of critical content map to paths on the new site?
  • Should users be allowed to create accounts (with spam considerations, and see if an admin should approve them).
Sprint Zero: starting the project

Here is what should get done in the first Agile sprint, aka Sprint Zero:

  • If you are using continuous integration, a Jenkins job for tracking the master branch: this job should fail if any test fails on the codebase, or if quality metrics (code review, for example, or pdepend metrics) reach predefined thresholds.
  • A Jenkins job for pushing to dev. This is triggered by the first job if tests pass. It pushed the new code to the dev environment, and updates the dev environment's database. The database is never cloned; rather, a site deployment module is used.
  • An issue queue is set up and the client is given access to it, and training on how to use it.
  • A wiki is set up.
  • A dev environment is set up. This is where the code gets pushed automatically if all tests pass.
  • A prod environment is set up. This environment is normally updated manually after each end of sprint demo.
  • A git repo is set up with a basic Drupal site.
  • A custom module is set up in sites/*/modules/custom: this is where custom function go.
  • A site deployment module in sites/all/modules/custom. All deployment-related code and dependencies go here. A .test file and an .install should be included.
  • A site development module is set up in sites/*/modules/custom, which is meant to contain all modules required or useful for development, as dependencies.
  • A custom theme is created.
  • An initial feature is created in sites/*/modules/features. This is where all your features will be added.
  • A "sites/*/modules/patches" folder is created (with a README.txt file, to make sure it goes into git). This is where core and contrib patches should go. Your site's maintainers should apply these patches when core or contrib modules are updated. Patch names here should include the node id and comment number on Drupal.org.
Basic module list (always used) Development modules (not enabled on production)

I normally create a custom development module with these as dependencies:

Multilingual modules Launch checklist
  • Design a custom 404, error and maintenance page.
  • Path, alias and permalink strategy. (Might require pathauto.)
  • Think of adding revisions to content types to avoid clients losing their data.
  • Don't display errors on production.
  • Optimize CSS, JS and page caching.
  • Views should be cached.
  • System messages are properly themed.
  • Prevent very simple passwords.
  • Using syslog instead of dblog on prod
In conclusion

Most shops, and most developers, have some sort of checklist like this. Mine is not any better or worse than most, but can be a good starting point. Another note: I've seen at least three Drupal teams try, and fail, to implement a "Drupal Starter kit for Company XYZ" and keep it under version control. The problem with that approach, as opposed to a checklist, is that it's not lightweight enough: it is a software product which needs maintenance, and after a while no one maintains it.

Tags: blogplanet
Categories: Straight From Drupal

Modules Unraveled: 113 - Updates on the WalkHub project with Kristof Van Tomme - Modules Unraveled Podcast

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2014-07-30 13:39
Photo of Kristof Van TommePublished: Wed, 07/30/14Download this episodeWalkhub
  • You’ve been on the show before to talk about walkthrough.it, but some things have changed since then. So, can you give us an overview of what Walkhub is?
  • What are walkthroughs?
  • What is your pricing model on Walkhub?
  • You’re in the process of a second Indiegogo campaign, but what was the first one for?
    • How did your first Indiegogo campaign go?
  • What is the current Indiegogo camaipn for?
    • What’s the status on that?
  • Why are you doing another campaign? Why aren’t you out of BETA yet? What’s the story there?
AMA
  • You just did an AMA on Reddit yesterday. How did that go?
  • What were some common questions? Or ones that stuck out to you?
Episode Links: Kristof on drupal.orgKristof on TwitterIndiegogo CampaignWalkhub.netReddit AMAWalkhub Demo on YouTubeTags: 

Modules Unraveled: 113 - Updates on the WalkHub project with Kristof Van Tomme - Modules Unraveled Podcast

Feeds from Drupal.org - Wed, 2014-07-30 13:39
Photo of Kristof Van TommePublished: Wed, 07/30/14Download this episodeWalkhub
  • You’ve been on the show before to talk about walkthrough.it, but some things have changed since then. So, can you give us an overview of what Walkhub is?
  • What are walkthroughs?
  • What is your pricing model on Walkhub?
  • You’re in the process of a second Indiegogo campaign, but what was the first one for?
    • How did your first Indiegogo campaign go?
  • What is the current Indiegogo camaipn for?
    • What’s the status on that?
  • Why are you doing another campaign? Why aren’t you out of BETA yet? What’s the story there?
AMA
  • You just did an AMA on Reddit yesterday. How did that go?
  • What were some common questions? Or ones that stuck out to you?
Episode Links: Kristof on drupal.orgKristof on TwitterIndiegogo CampaignWalkhub.netReddit AMAWalkhub Demo on YouTubeTags: 
Categories: Straight From Drupal

Phase2: Amazing Design Through Empathy

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2014-07-30 13:10
What can web designers learn from design of a timepiece for the blind?

 

The difference between a good product and an amazing one boils down to one thing: Empathy. Developing an understanding of your users that is so deep that you can feel what they feel enables you to design products and experiences that will truly resonate with your users.

Through illustrative and entertaining examples, I will take you on a tour of the the highs that are achievable through empathic design, and some of the depths that designers sink to when they design without empathy. You’ll learn how to activate the empathy that is already within you, and how you can use that power to improve all aspects of your product design, from requirements gathering to user research, and everything in between.

Join me for my presentations on this topic this week:

 

Drupal Capital Camp & Gov’t Days

Wednesday, July 30 from 11:15AM – Noon in room F1/F2

Design4Drupal Boston 2014

Saturday, August 2 from 3:30 – 4:30pm in room 141

 

Phase2: Amazing Design Through Empathy

Feeds from Drupal.org - Wed, 2014-07-30 13:10
What can web designers learn from design of a timepiece for the blind?

 

The difference between a good product and an amazing one boils down to one thing: Empathy. Developing an understanding of your users that is so deep that you can feel what they feel enables you to design products and experiences that will truly resonate with your users.

Through illustrative and entertaining examples, I will take you on a tour of the the highs that are achievable through empathic design, and some of the depths that designers sink to when they design without empathy. You’ll learn how to activate the empathy that is already within you, and how you can use that power to improve all aspects of your product design, from requirements gathering to user research, and everything in between.

Join me for my presentations on this topic this week:

 

Drupal Capital Camp & Gov’t Days

Wednesday, July 30 from 11:15AM – Noon in room F1/F2

Design4Drupal Boston 2014

Saturday, August 2 from 3:30 – 4:30pm in room 141

 

Categories: Straight From Drupal

Code Karate: Drupal 7 Panelizer Module

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2014-07-30 12:57
Episode Number: 160Drupal 7 Panelizer module - Daily Dose of Drupal episode 160

The Drupal 7 Panelizer Module allows you to panelize (or use panels) for any entity type on your Drupal 7 site. This allows you to change the layout of a node page, user page, or any other type of entity that you can think of. Although it's a little more complicated to set up, the Panelizer module allows you to set up a slimmed down panels interface for other site managers to use.

Tags: DrupalPanelsDrupal 7Site BuildingDrupal Planet

Code Karate: Drupal 7 Panelizer Module

Feeds from Drupal.org - Wed, 2014-07-30 12:57
Episode Number: 160Drupal 7 Panelizer module - Daily Dose of Drupal episode 160

The Drupal 7 Panelizer Module allows you to panelize (or use panels) for any entity type on your Drupal 7 site. This allows you to change the layout of a node page, user page, or any other type of entity that you can think of. Although it's a little more complicated to set up, the Panelizer module allows you to set up a slimmed down panels interface for other site managers to use.

Tags: DrupalPanelsDrupal 7Site BuildingDrupal Planet
Categories: Straight From Drupal

Flickr: Free Drupal 7 theme #drupal_9082

Feeds from Drupal.org - Wed, 2014-07-30 12:10

Free-Templates.lt posted a photo:

Free Drupal 7 theme #drupal_9082

via Free-Templates.lt - Free Drupal, Wordpress, Joomla themes bit.ly/1qlTijf FREE-TEMPLATES.LT

Categories: Straight From Drupal

TUnit

Latest Drupal Modules - Wed, 2014-07-30 10:49

twistor's unit testing helpers.

8.x has PHPunit. 7.x does not.

TUnit is a collection of hacks to help unit testing for 7.x.

Suggestions are more than welcome.

Categories: Straight From Drupal

Forum One: Double the Fun: DC Drupalists Unite!

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2014-07-30 08:17

F1-drupal-sticker

What could be more fun than summer camp? A Drupal summer camp, of course. And what could be more fun than a Drupal summer camp? Why, two Drupal summer camps, of course – merged into one!

This week we’re witnessing the unity of two long-awaited DC Drupal events with the joining of CapitalCamp and Drupal 4 Gov into a single event – CapitalCamp and Gov Days – and we’re enthused by all the possibilities that will come from having our local Drupal friends all in one place!

On Your Mark, Get Set…

This year we’re doing something brand new at CapitalCamp – we’re sprinting! That’s right, Forum One is hosting a Coder Lounge and Code Sprint room (Rooms C1 & C2) for fellow Drupalists to collaborate and bang out code together. This dedicated room will be available throughout CapitalCamp and Gov Days for developers to meet, greet, and collaborate on Drupal 8 code sprints. Developers will be convening in the mornings and afternoons to introduce sprints, identify issues, and get each other up and running…er, sprinting. Whether you’re new to code sprints or a seasoned veteran, come join us and contribute to the future of Drupal!

Expert Sessions

Our all-star team is proud to be presenting five sessions to the DC Drupal community this year!

On WednesdayDan Mouyard presents on Advanced Theming Tactics, covering how to follow the Drupal 8 CSS Architecture Guidelines while theming a Drupal 7 site, including:

  • Controlling Drupal’s markup
  • Creating custom layouts
  • Organizing your Sass partial structure
  • Using SMACSS to write maintainable CSS

Later in the day, William Hurley will be demystifying acronyms and bureaucratese with his session on Deploying Secure Drupal Sites, providing a roadmap for developers and IT managers to meet government security obligations while laying out specific issues that might be encountered, and how to overcome them.

On Thursday afternoon, Michael Rader, Sarah LeNguyen, and John Schneider are excited to present Hot Planet, Cool Site: Relaunching GlobalChange.gov – the inside story of the design and relaunch of this major website under the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) that focuses on assessing the impacts of climate change in the United States. Relaunching GlobalChange.gov was a big project that garnered big praise from the national press (and even the White House!), so we’re thrilled to be presenting on the site with our client at USGCRP for the first time.

And also on Thursday, Kalpana Goel will join with William Hurley to present a session on Routing in Drupal 8 to explain the many parts of routing, how to convert from the Drupal 7 menu system to the Drupal 8 routing system, as well as defining local tasks, local actions, and contextual links in Drupal 8.

But that’s not all, because on Friday, William returns for a CapitalCamp threepeat to present his final session of the conference: Automate All The Things – addressing why you need to be using automation, the tools you can use to make your development faster, easier and less error-prone, and common pitfalls that you might encounter along the way.

Seeing Red

As at DrupalCon last month, you’ll find Forum One staff in the hallways, sessions, and BoFs wearing our red shirts. Among our other attendees this week:

Once again, we’re excited as always to be actively participating in our hometown Drupal camps and are looking forward to sharing our knowledge, meeting new Drupal friends, and learning about new projects for us to explore.

Will you be at CapitalCamp and Gov Days this week? Stop by the Forum One Coder Lounge to say hi, or drop us a line at marketing@forumone.com – we’d love to meet up with you at Camp this year!

Forum One: Double the Fun: DC Drupalists Unite!

Feeds from Drupal.org - Wed, 2014-07-30 08:17

F1-drupal-sticker

What could be more fun than summer camp? A Drupal summer camp, of course. And what could be more fun than a Drupal summer camp? Why, two Drupal summer camps, of course – merged into one!

This week we’re witnessing the unity of two long-awaited DC Drupal events with the joining of CapitalCamp and Drupal 4 Gov into a single event – CapitalCamp and Gov Days – and we’re enthused by all the possibilities that will come from having our local Drupal friends all in one place!

On Your Mark, Get Set…

This year we’re doing something brand new at CapitalCamp – we’re sprinting! That’s right, Forum One is hosting a Coder Lounge and Code Sprint room (Rooms C1 & C2) for fellow Drupalists to collaborate and bang out code together. This dedicated room will be available throughout CapitalCamp and Gov Days for developers to meet, greet, and collaborate on Drupal 8 code sprints. Developers will be convening in the mornings and afternoons to introduce sprints, identify issues, and get each other up and running…er, sprinting. Whether you’re new to code sprints or a seasoned veteran, come join us and contribute to the future of Drupal!

Expert Sessions

Our all-star team is proud to be presenting five sessions to the DC Drupal community this year!

On WednesdayDan Mouyard presents on Advanced Theming Tactics, covering how to follow the Drupal 8 CSS Architecture Guidelines while theming a Drupal 7 site, including:

  • Controlling Drupal’s markup
  • Creating custom layouts
  • Organizing your Sass partial structure
  • Using SMACSS to write maintainable CSS

Later in the day, William Hurley will be demystifying acronyms and bureaucratese with his session on Deploying Secure Drupal Sites, providing a roadmap for developers and IT managers to meet government security obligations while laying out specific issues that might be encountered, and how to overcome them.

On Thursday afternoon, Michael Rader, Sarah LeNguyen, and John Schneider are excited to present Hot Planet, Cool Site: Relaunching GlobalChange.gov – the inside story of the design and relaunch of this major website under the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) that focuses on assessing the impacts of climate change in the United States. Relaunching GlobalChange.gov was a big project that garnered big praise from the national press (and even the White House!), so we’re thrilled to be presenting on the site with our client at USGCRP for the first time.

And also on Thursday, Kalpana Goel will join with William Hurley to present a session on Routing in Drupal 8 to explain the many parts of routing, how to convert from the Drupal 7 menu system to the Drupal 8 routing system, as well as defining local tasks, local actions, and contextual links in Drupal 8.

But that’s not all, because on Friday, William returns for a CapitalCamp threepeat to present his final session of the conference: Automate All The Things – addressing why you need to be using automation, the tools you can use to make your development faster, easier and less error-prone, and common pitfalls that you might encounter along the way.

Seeing Red

As at DrupalCon last month, you’ll find Forum One staff in the hallways, sessions, and BoFs wearing our red shirts. Among our other attendees this week:

Once again, we’re excited as always to be actively participating in our hometown Drupal camps and are looking forward to sharing our knowledge, meeting new Drupal friends, and learning about new projects for us to explore.

Will you be at CapitalCamp and Gov Days this week? Stop by the Forum One Coder Lounge to say hi, or drop us a line at marketing@forumone.com – we’d love to meet up with you at Camp this year!

Categories: Straight From Drupal

Janez Urevc: Progress of Disqus project in GSoC 2014

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2014-07-30 06:57

For more info about the project and it's progress see the post on groups.drupal.org.

Janez Urevc: Progress of Disqus project in GSoC 2014

Feeds from Drupal.org - Wed, 2014-07-30 06:57

For more info about the project and it's progress see the post on groups.drupal.org.

Categories: Straight From Drupal

DrupalCon Amsterdam: Become a Mentor at DrupalCon Amsterdam

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2014-07-30 06:29

From volunteering your time at events to making a donation, there are plenty of ways to give back to the Drupal project - but by and large, one of the most important things individual Drupalers can do is donate their expertise and become a mentor.

Currently, we have only 24 mentors signed up, and we need 40 mentors to make DrupalCon Amsterdam a success. We’re anticipating several hundred individuals sign up for to join the sprint on Friday and mentorship is a great way to help people new to contributing learn Drupal and, eventually, contribute back valuable time, resources, and code to the project.

To become a mentor, click here to sign up. We need mentors for all levels of Drupal expertise, from teaching absolute Drupal beginners to assisting advanced users how to navigate the Drupal.org issue queue.

Need a ticket to attend?

There are a limited number of free DrupalCon ticket coupons available for people who sign up to mentor, and the deadline to sign up and request a ticket is Friday, 1 August. Don't miss out on an opportunity to help others and get your ticket sponsored!

We’re looking forward to the Amsterdam Mentored Code Sprint and the First-Time Sprinter Workshop. We hope that you’ll join us there!

--
Cathy Theys (YesCT)
Brian Gillbert (realityloop)
Ruben Teijeiro (rteijeiro)
DrupalCon Amsterdam Sprint Leads

DrupalCon Amsterdam: Become a Mentor at DrupalCon Amsterdam

Feeds from Drupal.org - Wed, 2014-07-30 06:29

From volunteering your time at events to making a donation, there are plenty of ways to give back to the Drupal project - but by and large, one of the most important things individual Drupalers can do is donate their expertise and become a mentor.

Currently, we have only 24 mentors signed up, and we need 40 mentors to make DrupalCon Amsterdam a success. We’re anticipating several hundred individuals sign up for to join the sprint on Friday and mentorship is a great way to help people new to contributing learn Drupal and, eventually, contribute back valuable time, resources, and code to the project.

To become a mentor, click here to sign up. We need mentors for all levels of Drupal expertise, from teaching absolute Drupal beginners to assisting advanced users how to navigate the Drupal.org issue queue.

Need a ticket to attend?

There are a limited number of free DrupalCon ticket coupons available for people who sign up to mentor, and the deadline to sign up and request a ticket is Friday, 1 August. Don't miss out on an opportunity to help others and get your ticket sponsored!

We’re looking forward to the Amsterdam Mentored Code Sprint and the First-Time Sprinter Workshop. We hope that you’ll join us there!

--
Cathy Theys (YesCT)
Brian Gillbert (realityloop)
Ruben Teijeiro (rteijeiro)
DrupalCon Amsterdam Sprint Leads

Categories: Straight From Drupal

Password Separate Form

Latest Drupal Modules - Wed, 2014-07-30 06:20

A request that I got from multiple clients is to have a separate password change form. Current Password mechanism is on User account page and a little bit confusing.

Categories: Straight From Drupal

Gesso

Latest Drupal Themes - Wed, 2014-07-30 00:36

Gesso is a Sass-based theme geared towards advanced themers who want a solid starting point that follows the Drupal 8 CSS architecture guidelines.

Accessibility Pledge

#D8AX - We pledge to make this theme as accessible as it can be. If you find any flaws, please submit an issue. Help us fix them if you can.

Categories: Straight From Drupal

Pages

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