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Latest Drupal Modules - Fri, 2017-08-18 09:02
Categories: Straight From Drupal

Chapter Three: How to Fix HTML Content Issues During Migration in Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2017-08-18 00:20

In this post I will show you a technique to fix HTML issues, import images or perform content operations during migrations.

We have to fix source content before most content migrations. This can be challenging if there are many entries in the source database. The powerful Drupal 8 Migration API provides elegant ways to solve this type of problem.

To solve HTML issues, I always create my own process plugin. Here is an example how you would call your own process plugin to fix HTML issues in the body field:

Chapter Three: How to Fix HTML Content Issues During Migration in Drupal 8

Feeds from Drupal.org - Fri, 2017-08-18 00:20

In this post I will show you a technique to fix HTML issues, import images or perform content operations during migrations.

We have to fix source content before most content migrations. This can be challenging if there are many entries in the source database. The powerful Drupal 8 Migration API provides elegant ways to solve this type of problem.

To solve HTML issues, I always create my own process plugin. Here is an example how you would call your own process plugin to fix HTML issues in the body field:

Categories: Straight From Drupal

Promet Source: Configuration Split: Managing Drupal 8 Configuration for Different Environments

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2017-08-17 20:43
With the introduction of Drupal 8, the Drupal project introduced a bit of a paradigm shift for managing configuration for Drupal sites, moving toward encapsulating configuration separately from content, and providing a mechanism to manage configuration changes more effectively through Configuration Manager, which is a Drupal Core module.  Configuration Manager provides a mechanism for importing, exporting and synchronizing a site’s configuration components, which is great when you want to maintain a consistent configuration across different development environments.

Promet Source: Configuration Split: Managing Drupal 8 Configuration for Different Environments

Feeds from Drupal.org - Thu, 2017-08-17 20:43
With the introduction of Drupal 8, the Drupal project introduced a bit of a paradigm shift for managing configuration for Drupal sites, moving toward encapsulating configuration separately from content, and providing a mechanism to manage configuration changes more effectively through Configuration Manager, which is a Drupal Core module.  Configuration Manager provides a mechanism for importing, exporting and synchronizing a site’s configuration components, which is great when you want to maintain a consistent configuration across different development environments.
Categories: Straight From Drupal

Chiranjeeb Mahanta | Blog: GSoC’17 Coding period | Week #11 | Uc wishlist

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2017-08-17 19:01
GSoC’17 Coding period | Week #11 | Uc wishlist chiranjeeb2410 Thu, 08/17/2017 - 15:01

Chiranjeeb Mahanta | Blog: GSoC’17 Coding period | Week #11 | Uc wishlist

Feeds from Drupal.org - Thu, 2017-08-17 19:01
GSoC’17 Coding period | Week #11 | Uc wishlist chiranjeeb2410 Thu, 08/17/2017 - 15:01
Categories: Straight From Drupal

Acquia Lightning Blog: Using the Content API

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2017-08-17 17:41
Using the Content API Adam Balsam Thu, 08/17/2017 - 13:41

Lightning 2.1.7 includes a new top-level component: Content API. Its purpose is to provide a very basic server-side framework for building decoupled apps using Lightning as a backend. It has no strong opinions about how the "front-end" of such an application is implemented -- out of the box, it merely provides tools to deliver Drupal entities according to the JSON API specification.

Generally speaking, you can interact with API anonymously in the same way that an anonymous user can interact with a standard Drupal site. So you can do things like get a single piece of content, or a list of content without authenticating. For other actions -- the kind that would normally require you to be logged in to Drupal -- you will need to provide an OAuth access token in the header of your request. Tokens are related to a Drupal user and an OAuth client, which is associated with any number of Drupal user roles. You can obtain a token by making a specific HTTP request for it.

Let's go through some common, generic, use cases. I'll use cURL in my example so that you can easily test them out for yourself.

Getting a list of content

The API endpoints generally follow the following pattern: "/jsonapi/{entity-type}/{bundle}". So if we wanted to get a list of Basic Page content, we could send a GET request to "/jsonapi/node/page":

curl --request GET \ --url https://example.com/jsonapi/node/page

Which would return something like this:

{ "data": [ { "type": "node--page", "id": "api_test-unpublished-page-content", "attributes": { "nid": 1, "uuid": "api_test-unpublished-page-content", "vid": 1, "langcode": "en", "status": false, "title": "Unpublished Page", "created": 1502985175, "changed": 1502985175, "promote": false, "sticky": false, "revision_timestamp": 1502985175, "revision_log": null, "revision_translation_affected": true, "default_langcode": true, "path": null, "body": { "value": "--TESTING--", "format": null, "summary": null } }, "relationships": { "type": { "data": { "type": "node_type--node_type", "id": "8bae5c5c-697d-4b8a-ab22-b72e895a3b24" }, "links": { "self": "https://headlessnightlytfrimmmkug.devcloud.acquia-sites.com/jsonapi/node/page/api_test-unpublished-page-content/relationships/type", "related": "https://headlessnightlytfrimmmkug.devcloud.acquia-sites.com/jsonapi/node/page/api_test-unpublished-page-content/type" } }, "uid": { "data": { "type": "user--user", "id": "4d7eb3c7-db6d-4a01-8b3d-7d706d314f87" }, "links": { "self": "https://headlessnightlytfrimmmkug.devcloud.acquia-sites.com/jsonapi/node/page/api_test-unpublished-page-content/relationships/uid", "related": "https://headlessnightlytfrimmmkug.devcloud.acquia-sites.com/jsonapi/node/page/api_test-unpublished-page-content/uid" } }, "revision_uid": { "data": { "type": "user--user", "id": "4d7eb3c7-db6d-4a01-8b3d-7d706d314f87" }, "links": { "self": "https://headlessnightlytfrimmmkug.devcloud.acquia-sites.com/jsonapi/node/page/api_test-unpublished-page-content/relationships/revision_uid", "related": "https://headlessnightlytfrimmmkug.devcloud.acquia-sites.com/jsonapi/node/page/api_test-unpublished-page-content/revision_uid" } }, "moderation_state": { "data": { "type": "moderation_state--moderation_state", "id": "1a5f02e6-3f14-46a7-a40c-65590c8729a9" }, "links": { "self": "https://headlessnightlytfrimmmkug.devcloud.acquia-sites.com/jsonapi/node/page/api_test-unpublished-page-content/relationships/moderation_state", "related": "https://headlessnightlytfrimmmkug.devcloud.acquia-sites.com/jsonapi/node/page/api_test-unpublished-page-content/moderation_state" } }, "scheduled_update": { "data": [ ] } }, "links": { "self": "https://headlessnightlytfrimmmkug.devcloud.acquia-sites.com/jsonapi/node/page/api_test-unpublished-page-content" } }, ...

That's pretty verbose. We could simplify the response by adding the "fields" parameter. In this example, we only want the "title" and "created" fields:

curl --request GET \  --url https://example.com/jsonapi/node/page\ ?fields[node--page]=title,created # Note that I'm using `[` and `]` here for clarity. These characters need to be # encoded with `%5B` and `%5D` respectively if you want to actually use these # examples.

Which would return something like this:

{ "data": [ { "type": "node--page", "id": "0bee8eb7-0f06-4986-9ca0-e340021a0af3", "attributes": { "title": "A Page", "created": 1502985175 }, "links": { "self": "https://{DOMAIN.COM}/jsonapi/node/page/0bee8eb7-0f06-4986-9ca0-e340021a0af3" } }, { "type": "node--page", "id": "4d7eb3c7-db6d-4a01-8b3d-7d706d314f87", "attributes": { "title": "Another Page", "created": 1502985175 }, ... Getting a specific piece of content

We can request a specific piece of content by specifying its UUID in the URL:

curl --request GET \  --url https://example.com/jsonapi/node/page/0bee8eb7-0f06-4986-9ca0-e340021a0af3

 Which would return something like this (but more verbose since we didn't use the "field" parameter):

{ "data": { "type": "node--page", "id": "0bee8eb7-0f06-4986-9ca0-e340021a0af3", "attributes": { "title": "A Page", "created": 1502985175 }, "links": { "self": "https://example.com/jsonapi/node/page/0bee8eb7-0f06-4986-9ca0-e340021a0af3" } }, "links": { "self": "https://example.com/jsonapi/node/page/0bee8eb7-0f06-4986-9ca0-e340021a0af3?fields%5Bnode--page%5D=title%2Ccreated" } } Getting a token

You will need to provide an access token for any request that anonymous users are not authorized to execute. Tokens are granted via the "/oauth/token" endpoint, and requests for a token must include a client_id, client_secret, username, and password. OAuth clients inherit the permissions of standard Drupal user roles by selecting one or more roles on the client's configuration form, under "Scopes". A typical setup would involve the following steps:

  1. Create a Drupal role ("/admin/access/roles") with the permissions you want the consuming app to be allowed to perform.
  2. Create a Drupal user ("/admin/people/create") that the API will use and assign that user the role you just created.
  3. Create an OAuth2 client ("/admin/config/people/simple_oauth/oauth2_client/add") and assign it the same role as the user you just created via the Scopes section.

Once that's done, you can use the following to obtain an access token, where:

  • CLIENT_ID = The OAuth2 client UUID, displayed after creation of the client in Step 3 at "/admin/access/clients"
  • SECRET = The "New Secret" you chose when creating the client  in Step 3
  • USERNAME = The Drupal username of the user you created in Step 2
  • PASSWORD = The password you gave the Drupal user in Step 2
curl -X POST -d \ "grant_type=password\ &client_id={CLIENT_ID}\ &client_secret={SECRET}\ &username={USERNAME} &password={PASSWORD}"\ https://example.com/oauth/token

Which should generate a response like this:

{ "token_type": "Bearer", "expires_in": 300, "access_token": "eyJ0eXAiOiJKV1QiLCJhbGciOiJSUz...", "refresh_token": "def50200bdb9093a7a6cc837dhcd1..." }

If you want to give it a try without your own sandbox setup, Headless Lightning has a nightly build deployed to https://headlessnightlytfrimmmkug.devcloud.acquia-sites.com with a client and user preconfigured. So you should be able to use the "/oauth/token" endpoint there to get a valid token to our sandbox if you're curious.

Give it a try! Copy and paste the following into a terminal window:

curl --request POST \ --data "grant_type=password\ &client_id=api_test-oauth2-client\ &client_secret=oursecret\ &username=api-test-user\ &password=admin"\ https://headlessnightlytfrimmmkug.devcloud.acquia-sites.com/oauth/token Using a token

Once you have a token, it's easy to get data that anonymous users aren't authorized to access. Just add an Authorize header to your request, like so (replacing {ACCESS_TOKEN} with the access_token value in the /oauth/token response):

--header 'authorization: Bearer {ACCESS_TOKEN}'

So let's say we wanted to get a specific piece of content just like the "Get a specific piece of content" example above. But in this case, the content is unpublished and therefore anonymous users won't be able to access it. Given that the token was acquired:

  1. For an OAuth client that has a scope with the "View unpublished content" permission
  2. For user account that has a role with the same permission

We can successfully make the same request for an unpublished piece of content if we include the token in an authorization header like this:

curl --request GET \ --header 'authorization: Bearer {ACCESS_TOKEN}'\ --url https://example.com/jsonapi/node/page/api_test-unpublished-page-content # Where `api_test-unpublished-page-content` is the UUID of some piece of # unpublished content

Note how this request is identical to the anonymous request above except that it:

  1. Requests a resource that requires authorization
  2. Includes an "authorization" header

Given the authorization header, Content API will authenticate the request and then authorize it (or not) based on the permissions of the associated client and user.

Creating content

You can create new content by sending a POST request to "jsonapi/{entity-type}/{bundle}". You'll need to include a specific Content-Type header, and most configurations will require Authorization as well since anonymous users usually can't create content. For example:

curl --request POST \ --data '{"data": {"type": "node--page","attributes": {"title": "Created via JSON API"}}}'\ --header 'Content-Type: application/vnd.api+json'\ --header 'authorization: Bearer {ACCESS_TOKEN}'\ --url https://example.com/jsonapi/node/page Content vs Configuration Entities

Drupal makes a distinction between Content and Configuration entities. Sometimes content entities are further distinguished as being renderable and/or bundle-able. Content API makes no such distinctions. If your API client/user have permission to interact with an entity, it can do so through the API. That means you can do things like add fields to a content type via the API, or edit a moderation state transition.

Headless Lightning

Everything described here can be done with Lightning. But if you're building a decoupled application, you might want to check out Headless Lightning, which has a few additional features (and a few features removed) which make it more suitable for decoupled applications.

Acquia Lightning Blog: Using the Content API

Feeds from Drupal.org - Thu, 2017-08-17 17:41
Using the Content API Adam Balsam Thu, 08/17/2017 - 13:41

Lightning 2.1.7 includes a new top-level component: Content API. Its purpose is to provide a very basic server-side framework for building decoupled apps using Lightning as a backend. It has no strong opinions about how the "front-end" of such an application is implemented -- out of the box, it merely provides tools to deliver Drupal entities according to the JSON API specification.

Generally speaking, you can interact with API anonymously in the same way that an anonymous user can interact with a standard Drupal site. So you can do things like get a single piece of content, or a list of content without authenticating. For other actions -- the kind that would normally require you to be logged in to Drupal -- you will need to provide an OAuth access token in the header of your request. Tokens are related to a Drupal user and an OAuth client, which is associated with any number of Drupal user roles. You can obtain a token by making a specific HTTP request for it.

Let's go through some common, generic, use cases. I'll use cURL in my example so that you can easily test them out for yourself.

Getting a list of content

The API endpoints generally follow the following pattern: "/jsonapi/{entity-type}/{bundle}". So if we wanted to get a list of Basic Page content, we could send a GET request to "/jsonapi/node/page":

curl --request GET \ --url https://example.com/jsonapi/node/page

Which would return something like this:

{ "data": [ { "type": "node--page", "id": "api_test-unpublished-page-content", "attributes": { "nid": 1, "uuid": "api_test-unpublished-page-content", "vid": 1, "langcode": "en", "status": false, "title": "Unpublished Page", "created": 1502985175, "changed": 1502985175, "promote": false, "sticky": false, "revision_timestamp": 1502985175, "revision_log": null, "revision_translation_affected": true, "default_langcode": true, "path": null, "body": { "value": "--TESTING--", "format": null, "summary": null } }, "relationships": { "type": { "data": { "type": "node_type--node_type", "id": "8bae5c5c-697d-4b8a-ab22-b72e895a3b24" }, "links": { "self": "https://headlessnightlytfrimmmkug.devcloud.acquia-sites.com/jsonapi/node/page/api_test-unpublished-page-content/relationships/type", "related": "https://headlessnightlytfrimmmkug.devcloud.acquia-sites.com/jsonapi/node/page/api_test-unpublished-page-content/type" } }, "uid": { "data": { "type": "user--user", "id": "4d7eb3c7-db6d-4a01-8b3d-7d706d314f87" }, "links": { "self": "https://headlessnightlytfrimmmkug.devcloud.acquia-sites.com/jsonapi/node/page/api_test-unpublished-page-content/relationships/uid", "related": "https://headlessnightlytfrimmmkug.devcloud.acquia-sites.com/jsonapi/node/page/api_test-unpublished-page-content/uid" } }, "revision_uid": { "data": { "type": "user--user", "id": "4d7eb3c7-db6d-4a01-8b3d-7d706d314f87" }, "links": { "self": "https://headlessnightlytfrimmmkug.devcloud.acquia-sites.com/jsonapi/node/page/api_test-unpublished-page-content/relationships/revision_uid", "related": "https://headlessnightlytfrimmmkug.devcloud.acquia-sites.com/jsonapi/node/page/api_test-unpublished-page-content/revision_uid" } }, "moderation_state": { "data": { "type": "moderation_state--moderation_state", "id": "1a5f02e6-3f14-46a7-a40c-65590c8729a9" }, "links": { "self": "https://headlessnightlytfrimmmkug.devcloud.acquia-sites.com/jsonapi/node/page/api_test-unpublished-page-content/relationships/moderation_state", "related": "https://headlessnightlytfrimmmkug.devcloud.acquia-sites.com/jsonapi/node/page/api_test-unpublished-page-content/moderation_state" } }, "scheduled_update": { "data": [ ] } }, "links": { "self": "https://headlessnightlytfrimmmkug.devcloud.acquia-sites.com/jsonapi/node/page/api_test-unpublished-page-content" } }, ...

That's pretty verbose. We could simplify the response by adding the "fields" parameter. In this example, we only want the "title" and "created" fields:

curl --request GET \  --url https://example.com/jsonapi/node/page\ ?fields[node--page]=title,created # Note that I'm using `[` and `]` here for clarity. These characters need to be # encoded with `%5B` and `%5D` respectively if you want to actually use these # examples.

Which would return something like this:

{ "data": [ { "type": "node--page", "id": "0bee8eb7-0f06-4986-9ca0-e340021a0af3", "attributes": { "title": "A Page", "created": 1502985175 }, "links": { "self": "https://{DOMAIN.COM}/jsonapi/node/page/0bee8eb7-0f06-4986-9ca0-e340021a0af3" } }, { "type": "node--page", "id": "4d7eb3c7-db6d-4a01-8b3d-7d706d314f87", "attributes": { "title": "Another Page", "created": 1502985175 }, ... Getting a specific piece of content

We can request a specific piece of content by specifying its UUID in the URL:

curl --request GET \  --url https://example.com/jsonapi/node/page/0bee8eb7-0f06-4986-9ca0-e340021a0af3

 Which would return something like this (but more verbose since we didn't use the "field" parameter):

{ "data": { "type": "node--page", "id": "0bee8eb7-0f06-4986-9ca0-e340021a0af3", "attributes": { "title": "A Page", "created": 1502985175 }, "links": { "self": "https://example.com/jsonapi/node/page/0bee8eb7-0f06-4986-9ca0-e340021a0af3" } }, "links": { "self": "https://example.com/jsonapi/node/page/0bee8eb7-0f06-4986-9ca0-e340021a0af3?fields%5Bnode--page%5D=title%2Ccreated" } } Getting a token

You will need to provide an access token for any request that anonymous users are not authorized to execute. Tokens are granted via the "/oauth/token" endpoint, and requests for a token must include a client_id, client_secret, username, and password. OAuth clients inherit the permissions of standard Drupal user roles by selecting one or more roles on the client's configuration form, under "Scopes". A typical setup would involve the following steps:

  1. Create a Drupal role ("/admin/access/roles") with the permissions you want the consuming app to be allowed to perform.
  2. Create a Drupal user ("/admin/people/create") that the API will use and assign that user the role you just created.
  3. Create an OAuth2 client ("/admin/config/people/simple_oauth/oauth2_client/add") and assign it the same role as the user you just created via the Scopes section.

Once that's done, you can use the following to obtain an access token, where:

  • CLIENT_ID = The OAuth2 client UUID, displayed after creation of the client in Step 3 at "/admin/access/clients"
  • SECRET = The "New Secret" you chose when creating the client  in Step 3
  • USERNAME = The Drupal username of the user you created in Step 2
  • PASSWORD = The password you gave the Drupal user in Step 2
curl -X POST -d \ "grant_type=password\ &client_id={CLIENT_ID}\ &client_secret={SECRET}\ &username={USERNAME} &password={PASSWORD}"\ https://example.com/oauth/token

Which should generate a response like this:

{ "token_type": "Bearer", "expires_in": 300, "access_token": "eyJ0eXAiOiJKV1QiLCJhbGciOiJSUz...", "refresh_token": "def50200bdb9093a7a6cc837dhcd1..." }

If you want to give it a try without your own sandbox setup, Headless Lightning has a nightly build deployed to https://headlessnightlytfrimmmkug.devcloud.acquia-sites.com with a client and user preconfigured. So you should be able to use the "/oauth/token" endpoint there to get a valid token to our sandbox if you're curious.

Give it a try! Copy and paste the following into a terminal window:

curl --request POST \ --data "grant_type=password\ &client_id=api_test-oauth2-client\ &client_secret=oursecret\ &username=api-test-user\ &password=admin"\ https://headlessnightlytfrimmmkug.devcloud.acquia-sites.com/oauth/token Using a token

Once you have a token, it's easy to get data that anonymous users aren't authorized to access. Just add an Authorize header to your request, like so (replacing {ACCESS_TOKEN} with the access_token value in the /oauth/token response):

--header 'authorization: Bearer {ACCESS_TOKEN}'

So let's say we wanted to get a specific piece of content just like the "Get a specific piece of content" example above. But in this case, the content is unpublished and therefore anonymous users won't be able to access it. Given that the token was acquired:

  1. For an OAuth client that has a scope with the "View unpublished content" permission
  2. For user account that has a role with the same permission

We can successfully make the same request for an unpublished piece of content if we include the token in an authorization header like this:

curl --request GET \ --header 'authorization: Bearer {ACCESS_TOKEN}'\ --url https://example.com/jsonapi/node/page/api_test-unpublished-page-content # Where `api_test-unpublished-page-content` is the UUID of some piece of # unpublished content

Note how this request is identical to the anonymous request above except that it:

  1. Requests a resource that requires authorization
  2. Includes an "authorization" header

Given the authorization header, Content API will authenticate the request and then authorize it (or not) based on the permissions of the associated client and user.

Creating content

You can create new content by sending a POST request to "jsonapi/{entity-type}/{bundle}". You'll need to include a specific Content-Type header, and most configurations will require Authorization as well since anonymous users usually can't create content. For example:

curl --request POST \ --data '{"data": {"type": "node--page","attributes": {"title": "Created via JSON API"}}}'\ --header 'Content-Type: application/vnd.api+json'\ --header 'authorization: Bearer {ACCESS_TOKEN}'\ --url https://example.com/jsonapi/node/page Content vs Configuration Entities

Drupal makes a distinction between Content and Configuration entities. Sometimes content entities are further distinguished as being renderable and/or bundle-able. Content API makes no such distinctions. If your API client/user have permission to interact with an entity, it can do so through the API. That means you can do things like add fields to a content type via the API, or edit a moderation state transition.

Headless Lightning

Everything described here can be done with Lightning. But if you're building a decoupled application, you might want to check out Headless Lightning, which has a few additional features (and a few features removed) which make it more suitable for decoupled applications.

Categories: Straight From Drupal

Acquia Engage 2017: The Lineup

Acquia Blogs - Thu, 2017-08-17 15:52

Acquia Engage Lineup 2017
We’re about two months out from Acquia Engage 2017, and are so excited to share this year’s conference! We’ve put together an incredible line-up of main stage and breakout session speakers, incredible partners, and a host of networking activities to help maximize your time at the conference. Check out the highlights below, and see the full agenda here.

Pre-Conference Workshops
This year’s Pre-Conference Workshops feature half- and full-day options at Acquia’s headquarters in downtown Boston. For the morning sessions, you can choose from Digital Portfolio (all about digital strategy and building a roadmap) and Implementing Continuous Delivery. Afternoon sessions will cover two topics: personalization with Acquia Lift and multisite management with Acquia Cloud Site Factory.

These workshops are designed to provide an intimate learning environment, where you can collaborate with peers and develop practical strategies and tools to apply to your own digital journey. You can learn more about them and register here!

Talk Tracks
As in previous years, Engage will feature three talk tracks, with sessions covering everything from the business-end of digital, to the more technical side of implementation. This year’s tracks include:

Build: You live and breathe digital experiences, and are constantly on the lookout for the latest technology. Attend this tech-focused track to get under the hood of Acquia’s products and gain detailed knowledge that will take your sites and applications to the next level.

Share: The best way to learn about amazing digital experiences is by hearing about amazing Acquia customers. This eye-opening track will expand your thinking to new and creative ways, through learning how industry peers are tackling complex and interesting digital challenges.

Inspire: Together let’s explore the “art of the possible,” think outside the box, and become visionaries. New innovations, technology, and ideas are what shape our future, and this track will explore it all.

Keynote Speakers
We’ve got great mainstage keynote speakers lined up:

  • Scott Galloway, Professor at NYU Stern, and the expert in brand strategy and digital marketing
  • Eric Black, CTO at NBC Sports
  • Jeff Srour, CDO at Johnson & Johnson

Main Stage Sponsors
In addition to standout keynotes, several of our awesome sponsors will take the main stage — POSSIBLE, Accenture, MRM/McCann, Mirum, and VML.

Customer Speakers and Breakout Sponsors
We’ve rounded up a diverse group of customer speakers to tell you about their journeys with digital, and how they’re each leading the way in their respective industries to create new and exciting digital experiences. Here’s a sampling of the customer stories you can look forward to hearing:

  • DocuSign
  • Planet Fitness
  • Nestle/Purina
  • University of Minnesota
  • Powdr
  • American Institute of Architects
  • Princess Cruises
  • Centura Health
  • GeorgiaGov Interactive

And a big shout-out to our breakout sponsors, including HS2, Magento, Wunderman, and Digitas, who will be covering key concepts in digital during their sessions.

After-Hours Blue Drop Lounge Party
After a full day of conference activities and dinner in the city, we’ll be taking the Blue Drop Lounge outdoors for a fun and conversational after party. Enjoy fall-inspired cocktails, activities, and tunes mixed by a local DJ under the Boston skyline.

Of course, there’ll also be plenty of time to mingle with conference friends and meet our sponsoring partners. Register today! We really look forward to hosting you in October.

Categories: Drupal Universe

Mediacurrent: Webinar Recap: Estimating Web Projects

Feeds from Drupal.org - Thu, 2017-08-17 15:33

Everyone knows that process is important, but we have all gotten lost in the rush of daily tasks.

In our latest webinar, Project Management expert Rob McBryde and Vice President of Client Services James Rutherford shared how building and following a process for estimating web projects has driven success for their clients.

Categories: Straight From Drupal

Mediacurrent: Webinar Recap: Estimating Web Projects

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2017-08-17 15:33

Everyone knows that process is important, but we have all gotten lost in the rush of daily tasks.

In our latest webinar, Project Management expert Rob McBryde and Vice President of Client Services James Rutherford shared how building and following a process for estimating web projects has driven success for their clients.

Ben's SEO Blog: Headless Drupal and SEO: What Marketers Need to Know

Feeds from Drupal.org - Thu, 2017-08-17 15:12
Can you justify headless Drupal?

Decoupled—or “headless”—content management systems have been trending in the last few years. This web development strategy, in its most basic form, is a “write once, publish anywhere” technology that separates the content from the presentation layer. Well, um...what the heck does that mean? It means that you can publish a piece of content and then use different systems to display that blog post on a computer, a mobile device, a voice-based system like Amazon’s Alexa, or even a smart watch. Basically, it allows developers to write to many different platforms without having to tediously recreate the wheel each time. (I think…)

It is a hot topic in the Drupal community. In fact, Acquia is holding Decoupled Developer Days this weekend (August 19-20 in NYC). Much of the conversation... Read the full article: Headless Drupal and SEO: What Marketers Need to Know

Categories: Straight From Drupal

Ben's SEO Blog: Headless Drupal and SEO: What Marketers Need to Know

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2017-08-17 15:12
Can you justify headless Drupal?

Decoupled—or “headless”—content management systems have been trending in the last few years. This web development strategy, in its most basic form, is a “write once, publish anywhere” technology that separates the content from the presentation layer. Well, um...what the heck does that mean? It means that you can publish a piece of content and then use different systems to display that blog post on a computer, a mobile device, a voice-based system like Amazon’s Alexa, or even a smart watch. Basically, it allows developers to write to many different platforms without having to tediously recreate the wheel each time. (I think…)

It is a hot topic in the Drupal community. In fact, Acquia is holding Decoupled Developer Days this weekend (August 19-20 in NYC). Much of the conversation... Read the full article: Headless Drupal and SEO: What Marketers Need to Know

Website Redesign Discovery: Audit & SEO Content Assessment

Acquia Blogs - Thu, 2017-08-17 14:45

content management and search engine optimization practices
Previously in this series, Drew Robertson, Acquia’s Creative Director, explained how Acquia picked an agency for its website redesign. Catch up and read Drew’s blog here.

A building across the street from Acquia is being rebuilt from the inside, preserving its brick facade, stonework, arches and decorative motifs while the new offices climb higher through the shell to match the burgeoning Boston skyline.

I’d like to think we can draw some inspiration from the sight of powerful cranes recreating an antiquated relic as we redesign and rebuild Acquia’s flagship website.

Websites have a short shelf life. It doesn’t take long for the perception to be “Our site looks like it’s 1998 or something.” Bells, whistles, shiny objects, trendy colors, graphics, etc. don’t age well. The same goes for inherited flaws, a reminder of a pervading patchwork past.

It’s time to unearth the stone and brick, and use Acquia’s newest products and services to modernize with sleek steel and glass.

Nobody writes folk songs about auditing

To start the preparation for our move to Drupal 8, asset management capabilities, and our greater use of our latest personalization (Acquia Lift) , we took stock of everything on our site.

The effort included compiling lists of content and modules, purging superfluous content types and fields, reviewing features, tracking third-party tools, and cleaning up as many cobwebs as possible.

I, alone, rifled through 412 nodes dedicated to employee profiles. The process involved reconciling a list exported from Drupal with a list of current employees. Based on whether the person was still an employee, a member of Acquia leadership, and if he or she writes blogs for our sites, I decided which pages we’d keep, and which pages we’d kill.

I then went back through the list and deleted or unpublished 305 nodes, one by one.

That’s just one example of the tedium. In all, we reviewed more than 4,000 nodes, about 40 content types (deleted 15 or so) and every variation.

We really don’t want to bring technical debt with us to the new site.

The same basic tasks were performed for modules.

“We needed to see which modules we needed to do things on the website, and if there was a D8 version of that module,” said David Myburgh, Acquia.com’s primary back-end developer. “If not, what alternatives exist? If there are no alternatives, we need to figure out what to do in D8.”

Myburgh made a list of all enabled modules, and checked to see which ones could be removed, all while making a list of what we would need for the new site.

“I was really assuming we’d just migrate what we had,” he said. “However, it looks like we’ll be re-architecting completely. So much of the module stuff wasn’t really necessary. But it was useful to remove some cruft. So it was 50 percent useful, I would say.”

SEO is so, so important

Another painstaking task was assessing the search engine optimization of Acquia content.

The trick is to develop a new strategy and fix what’s broken, all while creating a plan to involve SEO in the process of creating content right from the start.

To get there, we need to let go of things we did for SEO in the past, some of which is just baggage now after Google has updated its algorithm, said Prasanna Kulkarni, web metrics analyst and user experience manager for Acquia.

“We needed to get stakeholders on the same page for what’s important,” Kulkarni said. “And in some cases, breaking misconceptions/myths about SEO or educating.”

Assessing our strengths and weaknesses isn’t enough. Defining a new system of measurement and consistently taking action is a must. Our internal teams need to use data to inform their decisions.

What’s next?

Now we can move toward the next task – how will we make our content tell our story and our customers’ stories in an effective and compelling fashion?

The big question is how do we go from a startup site to a showcase? One word: discipline.

Categories: Drupal Universe

Webform Skip

Latest Drupal Modules - Thu, 2017-08-17 13:32

This module makes a multi-step webform's progress bar "clickable" so users can skip to various parts of the form quickly.

When you enable this module, by default this functionality will be turned on for all multi-step webforms. You can disable on a per-webform basis with a setting in the "Progress Bar" section of a webform's configuration form.

Categories: Straight From Drupal

One Time Password SMS

Latest Drupal Modules - Thu, 2017-08-17 05:26

Adds the ability to receive one time passwords as SMS as an alternative to authenticator applications.

Categories: Straight From Drupal

Agiledrop.com Blog: AGILEDROP: Global Drupal Training Days are near

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2017-08-17 04:52
From time to time, we check Drupical. It's a website, where »you can Find Drupal events with ease!« With the help of it, we already presented you Drupal Camps, Virtual Drupal Camps, DrupalCons, Mini Drupal Camps and Global Drupal Sprint week. One of the nearest events is Drupal Introduction Workshop, listed on Trainings, so we’ll take a look at Drupal Trainings. More specifically, Global Drupal Training Days. To be completely fair, we presented Global Drupal Sprint Week a little late last time. We will not be making the same »mistake« again, so we'll look at the Drupal Global Training Days… READ MORE

Agiledrop.com Blog: AGILEDROP: Global Drupal Training Days are near

Feeds from Drupal.org - Thu, 2017-08-17 04:52
From time to time, we check Drupical. It's a website, where »you can Find Drupal events with ease!« With the help of it, we already presented you Drupal Camps, Virtual Drupal Camps, DrupalCons, Mini Drupal Camps and Global Drupal Sprint week. One of the nearest events is Drupal Introduction Workshop, listed on Trainings, so we’ll take a look at Drupal Trainings. More specifically, Global Drupal Training Days. To be completely fair, we presented Global Drupal Sprint Week a little late last time. We will not be making the same »mistake« again, so we'll look at the Drupal Global Training Days… READ MORE
Categories: Straight From Drupal

Transcript import

Latest Drupal Modules - Wed, 2017-08-16 20:24

This module will allow you to perform learner record imports to the Course suite of modules:

http://drupal.org/project/course
http://drupal.org/project/course_credit

While you can build importers that can import into entities such as Course enrollments, completions, and credit, importing to all 3 of them at the same time would require 3 different files and 3 different imports.

Categories: Straight From Drupal

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