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Authcache Recacher

Latest Drupal Modules - Fri, 2017-06-16 21:07
Categories: Straight From Drupal

Entity Compare

Latest Drupal Modules - Fri, 2017-06-16 21:02
Categories: Straight From Drupal

Drupal core announcements: Sprint with the migrate team at DrupalCamp Montreal

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2017-06-16 18:42
Start:  2017-06-15 (All day) - 2017-06-18 (All day) America/Toronto Event type:  Sprint

Several key contributors to the Migrate Initiative will be at the sprint at DrupalCamp Montreal on Sunday (and to some degree on earlier days as well). Join contributors Adam G-H (phenaproxima), Maxime Turcotte (maxocub) and Dave Vasilevsky (vasi) in person. Initiative coordinator Mike Ryan (mikeryan) is also planning to join remotely on Sunday.

Among the most important Migrate critical issues on the table that are planned to be worked on is auditing for potential ID conflicts before upgrading from older versions. This is the most thorny outstanding issue for the initiative. Use cases and feedback in general is welcome. Further migrate issues are categorized and tracked in the Migrate triage spreadsheet (update regularly). These include handling import of private files, adding back support for incremental migrations, redirecting for obsolete content translations when they are merged in the migration, etc. All of those need helping hands and this is a great time to get experienced with help from the most well versed people in the field.

If you cannot join the sprint this time, your involvement is more than welcome anytime. The migrate team has weekly meetings on every Thursday at alternating meeting times. See https://www.drupal.org/node/2735059#meet for the upcoming meetings.

Drupal core announcements: Sprint with the migrate team at DrupalCamp Montreal

Feeds from Drupal.org - Fri, 2017-06-16 18:42
Start:  2017-06-15 (All day) - 2017-06-18 (All day) America/Toronto Event type:  Sprint

Several key contributors to the Migrate Initiative will be at the sprint at DrupalCamp Montreal on Sunday (and to some degree on earlier days as well). Join contributors Adam G-H (phenaproxima), Maxime Turcotte (maxocub) and Dave Vasilevsky (vasi) in person. Initiative coordinator Mike Ryan (mikeryan) is also planning to join remotely on Sunday.

Among the most important Migrate critical issues on the table that are planned to be worked on is auditing for potential ID conflicts before upgrading from older versions. This is the most thorny outstanding issue for the initiative. Use cases and feedback in general is welcome. Further migrate issues are categorized and tracked in the Migrate triage spreadsheet (update regularly). These include handling import of private files, adding back support for incremental migrations, redirecting for obsolete content translations when they are merged in the migration, etc. All of those need helping hands and this is a great time to get experienced with help from the most well versed people in the field.

If you cannot join the sprint this time, your involvement is more than welcome anytime. The migrate team has weekly meetings on every Thursday at alternating meeting times. See https://www.drupal.org/node/2735059#meet for the upcoming meetings.

Categories: Straight From Drupal

EDUCO: Chicago Drupal Experts: 5 Examples of eLearning Sites Using Drupal

Feeds from Drupal.org - Fri, 2017-06-16 17:16
Marty Vernon

Here is our short list of eLearning websites that are using Drupal to power their online experience. A big thanks to Brian Gagnon at Acquia for helping to pull this list together!

Or if you'd like to see some of our work, you can check out our Portfolio.

edX's Drupal Site

edX eLearning website built with Drupal

eScience Labs' Drupal Site

eScience Labs eLearning website built with Drupal

Cornerstone's Drupal Site

Cornerstone eLearning website built with Drupal

Micro Tek's Drupal Site

MicroTek eLearning website built with Drupal

Lit Reactor's Drupal Site

Lit Reactor eLearning website built with Drupal

Sales Tax Institute

Sales Tax Institute eLearning website built with Drupal

Want to see some of our Case Studies? Check out our Portfolio.

Insights
Categories: Straight From Drupal

Ben's SEO Blog: Why Amazon.com Just Bought Whole Foods and What That Means for Drupal

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2017-06-16 16:21

Two of the biggest retailers in the world are getting together. This morning, Amazon.com, the juggernaut that continues to put massive pressure on brick-and-mortar retailers, announced that it is buying Whole Foods, the popular, high-end organic foods grocer.

Both companies are major stakeholders in the Drupal ecosystem: Amazon made an investment in Acquia in 2014, and much of Acquia’s hosting infrastructure relies on Amazon Web Services. Whole Foods, for its part, has used Drupal for its web presence for at least five years—if not much longer—and holds Acquia as a key partner. Acquia Drupal is a significant part of the Whole Foods DevOps story. (I can just imagine that email from the Whole Foods Accounts Payables department to Acquia: “Send the bill to Amazon.”)

From a presentation at an Acquia event:

So why would Amazon jump out and make this purchase? The answer is complex and multi-faceted.

For Amazon, it's all about the data.

First, Amazon is, at its core, a data company. They use shopping history and patterns to sell us things we need before we even know that we need them. With all the newly acquired data from Whole Foods upper-end clientele, Amazon can make more efficient stock decisions in both the retail and physical stores. In February, Whole Foods Chief Executive John Mackey said that they would retain the services of Dunnhumby, a customer data and insights company, to inform merchandising and services (in other words, help us stock our shelves and get our prices down). I can’t help but think that Amazon could do even better.

Distribution

Second, this acquisition gives Amazon access to a grocery distribution network that enhances their own. It creates more markets for home grocery delivery. Nomura Instinet analyst Anthony DiClemente recently said that the grocery industry remains one of the largest and most under-penetrated markets for Amazon. Well, that just changed.

How convenient could Whole Foods home delivery be? As Dries has demonstrated in recent keynotes (blog post: http://buytaert.net/cross-channel-user-experiences-with-drupal), I can envision a future where I ask my Echo Dot for some free-range chickpeas and organic shampoo and a Whole Foods van shows up at my door an hour or two later with my products (and as of today, with a sizable charge on my debit card).

The Whole Foods brand - a trip down memory lane

Third, it gives Amazon a very strong brand that is associated with organic groceries and high-end shopping experience.

I’m from Austin, and I’ve been shopping at Whole Foods since there was a single store in the early 80s. My family lived in nearby Temple so once a month we’d drive to Austin so Mom could shop at Whole Foods while us kids ran around the nearby Book Stop (Look it up. It was ahead of its time.), and eat at a fancy restaurant called Chilis.

So, maybe my brand recognition and a lifelong love of the grocery chain is stronger than most. There's no denying that it looms large over the health-food industry and is super-popular with upper-middle class soccer moms and those avocado-on-toast loving millennials we hear so much about (joke). How will Amazon leverage that loyalty? Could we see Amazon Fresh become “Whole Foods from Amazon”?

It's Go time.

The fourth and perhaps most compelling upside for the acquisition lies with Amazon Go, a recent experiment with automated retail stores.

Go is a frictionless shopping and checkout experience for physical stores. According to their website, you just “browse and shop like you would at any other store. Then you’re on the way: no lines, no checkout.”

Convenient.

It's currently only open to Amazon employees in a single Seattle store but the idea is as simple as the implementation is complicated: use advanced scanners and trackers to automate checkout. But what does this do to labor cost? In their commercial, the lone store employee is making sandwiches. That's hyperbole, but it makes that point: this is what Amazon wants. Any labor that doesn’t directly enhance the customer experience is suspect and should be eliminated as soon as possible.

Yesterday, outgoing CEO of GE Jeff Immelt scoffed that robots were not going to take over factory jobs in the next five years. Perhaps, but in retail, it has already begun. Many retailers from grocery stores to Home Depot offer self-checkout. If Amazon leads the way to friction-free checkout in supermarkets, retailers that do not follow in their footsteps will find that they’re the next Borders, CompUSA, or Radio Shack.

The Go technology isn't ready for real world use yet but let's say it's at most 36 months away from being ready for prime time. That means that in relatively short order, Amazon can dramatically reduce one of the biggest expenses Whole Foods carries today: labor. They'll still have the cheese guy and the bread lady—those personal interactions are why people shop at a high-end grocer after all. Still, no more jockeying for the shortest checkout lines. It's hugely convenient, and it will happen.

With Go, Amazon can now tackle Whole Foods’ biggest issue for most people: price. As much as I love it, my family doesn’t do our grocery shopping at Whole Foods. I have a great experience, but I need a second job just to pay the bill. In fact, I walk around with my iPhone out looking up pricing and even placing one-click orders on Amazon. Now, if I could get that Whole Foods experience at Amazon prices? Sign me up.

Amazon will continue to do what they do best: leverage technology to remove inefficiencies in established industries, give customers the best possible experience along the way, and provide a shortcut to the things I want to do. This combination is their killer app.

The Drupal Opportunity

The opportunity for Drupal companies could be limited or could be huge. It seems unlikely that Amazon will continue to use Drupal to power their Whole Foods infrastructure in the long run. In the short run, however, Whole Foods will continue to operate as an independent, wholly-owned subsidiary—just with a lot more coverage and support from the most technically-savvy retail company around.

Outside of the immediate timeframe, it could open opportunities to build closer ties to Amazon through the use of headless Drupal for backend data storage, retrieval, and integration. As much as retailers suffer from Amazon’s dominance, manufacturers benefit from frictionless distribution and additional sales channels that will be created. That gives us, the Drupal community, more opportunities to do what we do best with Drupal 8 and beyond. We can continue toward building voice interactions that tie into Amazon’s Alexa infrastructure in unique ways; Tech stacks that better integrate e-commerce platforms into Amazon’s listings and sales engine; and possibly even recruiting opportunities for top Drupal talent that may be winding down their tenure with Whole Foods.

And that’s not even to mention the retailers that want to compete with Amazon head-on. They need what Drupal has: vision, community, and a platform for building world-class, sustainable, and expandable solutions. They need technology that allows them to meet and beat the Amazon at their own game. They need a shortcut to success, and that’s Drupal 8.

Amazon, Whole Foods, and Drupal logoOpportunities for Drupal from a mega merger of Drupal community companies.Planet Drupal, amazon.com, whole foods, drupal news

Ben's SEO Blog: Why Amazon.com Just Bought Whole Foods and What That Means for Drupal

Feeds from Drupal.org - Fri, 2017-06-16 16:21

Two of the biggest retailers in the world are getting together. This morning, Amazon.com, the juggernaut that continues to put massive pressure on brick-and-mortar retailers, announced that it is buying Whole Foods, the popular, high-end organic foods grocer.

Both companies are major stakeholders in the Drupal ecosystem: Amazon made an investment in Acquia in 2014, and much of Acquia’s hosting infrastructure relies on Amazon Web Services. Whole Foods, for its part, has used Drupal for its web presence for at least five years—if not much longer—and holds Acquia as a key partner. Acquia Drupal is a significant part of the Whole Foods DevOps story. (I can just imagine that email from the Whole Foods Accounts Payables department to Acquia: “Send the bill to Amazon.”)

From a presentation at an Acquia event:

So why would Amazon jump out and make this purchase? The answer is complex and multi-faceted.

For Amazon, it's all about the data.

First, Amazon is, at its core, a data company. They use shopping history and patterns to sell us things we need before we even know that we need them. With all the newly acquired data from Whole Foods upper-end clientele, Amazon can make more efficient stock decisions in both the retail and physical stores. In February, Whole Foods Chief Executive John Mackey said that they would retain the services of Dunnhumby, a customer data and insights company, to inform merchandising and services (in other words, help us stock our shelves and get our prices down). I can’t help but think that Amazon could do even better.

Distribution

Second, this acquisition gives Amazon access to a grocery distribution network that enhances their own. It creates more markets for home grocery delivery. Nomura Instinet analyst Anthony DiClemente recently said that the grocery industry remains one of the largest and most under-penetrated markets for Amazon. Well, that just changed.

How convenient could Whole Foods home delivery be? As Dries has demonstrated in recent keynotes (blog post: http://buytaert.net/cross-channel-user-experiences-with-drupal), I can envision a future where I ask my Echo Dot for some free-range chickpeas and organic shampoo and a Whole Foods van shows up at my door an hour or two later with my products (and as of today, with a sizable charge on my debit card).

The Whole Foods brand - a trip down memory lane

Third, it gives Amazon a very strong brand that is associated with organic groceries and high-end shopping experience.

I’m from Austin, and I’ve been shopping at Whole Foods since there was a single store in the early 80s. My family lived in nearby Temple so once a month we’d drive to Austin so Mom could shop at Whole Foods while us kids ran around the nearby Book Stop (Look it up. It was ahead of its time.), and eat at a fancy restaurant called Chilis.

So, maybe my brand recognition and a lifelong love of the grocery chain is stronger than most. There's no denying that it looms large over the health-food industry and is super-popular with upper-middle class soccer moms and those avocado-on-toast loving millennials we hear so much about (joke). How will Amazon leverage that loyalty? Could we see Amazon Fresh become “Whole Foods from Amazon”?

It's Go time.

The fourth and perhaps most compelling upside for the acquisition lies with Amazon Go, a recent experiment with automated retail stores.

Go is a frictionless shopping and checkout experience for physical stores. According to their website, you just “browse and shop like you would at any other store. Then you’re on the way: no lines, no checkout.”

Convenient.

It's currently only open to Amazon employees in a single Seattle store but the idea is as simple as the implementation is complicated: use advanced scanners and trackers to automate checkout. But what does this do to labor cost? In their commercial, the lone store employee is making sandwiches. That's hyperbole, but it makes that point: this is what Amazon wants. Any labor that doesn’t directly enhance the customer experience is suspect and should be eliminated as soon as possible.

Yesterday, outgoing CEO of GE Jeff Immelt scoffed that robots were not going to take over factory jobs in the next five years. Perhaps, but in retail, it has already begun. Many retailers from grocery stores to Home Depot offer self-checkout. If Amazon leads the way to friction-free checkout in supermarkets, retailers that do not follow in their footsteps will find that they’re the next Borders, CompUSA, or Radio Shack.

The Go technology isn't ready for real world use yet but let's say it's at most 36 months away from being ready for prime time. That means that in relatively short order, Amazon can dramatically reduce one of the biggest expenses Whole Foods carries today: labor. They'll still have the cheese guy and the bread lady—those personal interactions are why people shop at a high-end grocer after all. Still, no more jockeying for the shortest checkout lines. It's hugely convenient, and it will happen.

With Go, Amazon can now tackle Whole Foods’ biggest issue for most people: price. As much as I love it, my family doesn’t do our grocery shopping at Whole Foods. I have a great experience, but I need a second job just to pay the bill. In fact, I walk around with my iPhone out looking up pricing and even placing one-click orders on Amazon. Now, if I could get that Whole Foods experience at Amazon prices? Sign me up.

Amazon will continue to do what they do best: leverage technology to remove inefficiencies in established industries, give customers the best possible experience along the way, and provide a shortcut to the things I want to do. This combination is their killer app.

The Drupal Opportunity

The opportunity for Drupal companies could be limited or could be huge. It seems unlikely that Amazon will continue to use Drupal to power their Whole Foods infrastructure in the long run. In the short run, however, Whole Foods will continue to operate as an independent, wholly-owned subsidiary—just with a lot more coverage and support from the most technically-savvy retail company around.

Outside of the immediate timeframe, it could open opportunities to build closer ties to Amazon through the use of headless Drupal for backend data storage, retrieval, and integration. As much as retailers suffer from Amazon’s dominance, manufacturers benefit from frictionless distribution and additional sales channels that will be created. That gives us, the Drupal community, more opportunities to do what we do best with Drupal 8 and beyond. We can continue toward building voice interactions that tie into Amazon’s Alexa infrastructure in unique ways; Tech stacks that better integrate e-commerce platforms into Amazon’s listings and sales engine; and possibly even recruiting opportunities for top Drupal talent that may be winding down their tenure with Whole Foods.

And that’s not even to mention the retailers that want to compete with Amazon head-on. They need what Drupal has: vision, community, and a platform for building world-class, sustainable, and expandable solutions. They need technology that allows them to meet and beat the Amazon at their own game. They need a shortcut to success, and that’s Drupal 8.

Amazon, Whole Foods, and Drupal logoOpportunities for Drupal from a mega merger of Drupal community companies.Planet Drupal, amazon.com, whole foods, drupal news
Categories: Straight From Drupal

interceptjs

Latest Drupal Modules - Fri, 2017-06-16 15:54

interceptjs is a jQuery plugin that allows site owners to control calls to action (CTA) that occur for anonymous users. Could be used to offer user experience surveys, for donation calls to action and more. This module hopes to implement a nice GUI to the library itself.

Categories: Straight From Drupal

Promet Source: Drupal Texas Camp Presentation: Harnessing Human Connection to Achieve Marketing Success

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2017-06-16 14:16
This blog post is transcribed from the session "More Social, Less Media: Harnessing the power of Human Connection to Achieve Marketing Success" presented by Molly Nelson at Drupal Texas Camp in Austin, TX - June 2017 More Social, Less Media

Promet Source: Drupal Texas Camp Presentation: Harnessing Human Connection to Achieve Marketing Success

Feeds from Drupal.org - Fri, 2017-06-16 14:16
This blog post is transcribed from the session "More Social, Less Media: Harnessing the power of Human Connection to Achieve Marketing Success" presented by Molly Nelson at Drupal Texas Camp in Austin, TX - June 2017 More Social, Less Media
Categories: Straight From Drupal

Profile score

Latest Drupal Modules - Fri, 2017-06-16 12:01
Categories: Straight From Drupal

Cached Computed Field

Latest Drupal Modules - Fri, 2017-06-16 09:20

A field that allows to cache computationally expensive computed data in field storage.

Use this field for computed data that is expensive to generate, for example data that requires NP-hard algorithms or data that comes from external sources.

Categories: Straight From Drupal

Heading field

Latest Drupal Modules - Fri, 2017-06-16 08:10

The heading module adds a new field type containing a text field and a heading
size. The field will be formatted as a HTML heading (h1 - h6).

This field type is created in the first place to be used within paragraphs.

Installation
  1. Download and extract this module to the modules/contrib directory or download using composer.
  2. Enable the module.
Usage

Create a content type or paragraph type and add the Text > Heading field to it.

Categories: Straight From Drupal

Init Test

Latest Drupal Modules - Fri, 2017-06-16 06:41

This is dummy description.

Categories: Straight From Drupal

Drupalera: La Drupalera te trae los eventos Drupal más refrescantes del verano

Feeds from Drupal.org - Fri, 2017-06-16 06:41
La Drupalera te trae los eventos Drupal más refrescantes del veranoLa Drupalera brings you the most refreshing Drupal events of the summer

En La Drupalera sabemos que no os gusta perderos las novedades de Drupal, ni aunque estéis de vacaciones. Por eso, y aunque esté oficialmente inaugurada la temporada de playa, aquí os dejamos algunos de los eventos más interesantes de la temporada estival.

15 de junio
Categories: Straight From Drupal

La Drupalera (en): La Drupalera brings you the most refreshing Drupal events of the summer

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2017-06-16 06:39
La Drupalera brings you the most refreshing Drupal events of the summerLa Drupalera brings you the most refreshing Drupal events of the summer

 

We know that you don’t want to lose news of Drupal. For that reason, and although it has officially started beach season, here you have the most interesting events of this summer.

June 15

La Drupalera (en): La Drupalera brings you the most refreshing Drupal events of the summer

Feeds from Drupal.org - Fri, 2017-06-16 06:39
La Drupalera brings you the most refreshing Drupal events of the summerLa Drupalera brings you the most refreshing Drupal events of the summer

 

We know that you don’t want to lose news of Drupal. For that reason, and although it has officially started beach season, here you have the most interesting events of this summer.

June 15
Categories: Straight From Drupal

OhTheHugeManatee: Better PHP === Better Drupalists: The PHP Track at Drupalcon Vienna

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2017-06-15 15:19

One of the best parts of Drupal 8 is our shift to enterprise PHP coding structures. With tools like composer and Symfony’s structures like Events and Dependency Injection, Drupalists are learning to be great PHP developers, and vice-versa. Today, the fastest route to becoming a rock star Drupalist is through PHP.

I’m one of the PHP track chairs for Drupalcon Vienna, and this year our focus is better PHP === better Drupalists. How can better PHP make your life as a Drupal developer easier?

Do you like PHP 7? We want to hear about the technicalities of types, throwing all the things, and your favorite operators (mine is null coalesce, but full respect for you spaceship operator fans).

Have you seen the light of functional programming? Tell us why we should love higher orders with lambda functions and closures. Let’s hear the finer points of first class functions.

Do your tests bring all the bugs to the yard? We want to talk about it. Every method is a promise, and your tests make sure you keep your promises. We want sessions about test driven development in a drupal context, choosing the right test framework and scope, and how your real-world tests are saving you real-world time.

Have you written a composer library wrapper module yet? Submit a session about how composer is saving you lines of code.

Is your development environment fine-tuned for drupal excellence? Tell us how, and why.

We have only two weeks left until session submissions close! Get your session in now and help us make Drupal code something to be proud of.

OhTheHugeManatee: Better PHP === Better Drupalists: The PHP Track at Drupalcon Vienna

Feeds from Drupal.org - Thu, 2017-06-15 15:19

One of the best parts of Drupal 8 is our shift to enterprise PHP coding structures. With tools like composer and Symfony’s structures like Events and Dependency Injection, Drupalists are learning to be great PHP developers, and vice-versa. Today, the fastest route to becoming a rock star Drupalist is through PHP.

I’m one of the PHP track chairs for Drupalcon Vienna, and this year our focus is better PHP === better Drupalists. How can better PHP make your life as a Drupal developer easier?

Do you like PHP 7? We want to hear about the technicalities of types, throwing all the things, and your favorite operators (mine is null coalesce, but full respect for you spaceship operator fans).

Have you seen the light of functional programming? Tell us why we should love higher orders with lambda functions and closures. Let’s hear the finer points of first class functions.

Do your tests bring all the bugs to the yard? We want to talk about it. Every method is a promise, and your tests make sure you keep your promises. We want sessions about test driven development in a drupal context, choosing the right test framework and scope, and how your real-world tests are saving you real-world time.

Have you written a composer library wrapper module yet? Submit a session about how composer is saving you lines of code.

Is your development environment fine-tuned for drupal excellence? Tell us how, and why.

We have only two weeks left until session submissions close! Get your session in now and help us make Drupal code something to be proud of.

Categories: Straight From Drupal

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